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Disposing of cat litter- FAQs

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Disposing of cat litter- FAQs

Perks of getting a cat home can revolve around their freedom and stay in a clean environment, however, even the cleanest cats need to use the facilities. We have asked so many cat parents, and most of them have told us that their least preferred chore that concerns their kitty is cleaning the litter container. It's stinky and a bit painful at times as litter isn't exactly the lightest factor on earth. But it is necessary if you want your cat to be healthy and hygienic at all times. 

What is the right way to dispose of cat litter?

Throw it in the trash:

Litter boxes need to be scooped at the least once a day. Use a litter scoop to sift out urine clumps and stool and put it in a small trash bag. Once all the litter boxes in your home are scooped, drop it in the dustbin bag.

To prevent scent and bacterial leakage, put the litter in double bags. Place in an out of doors trash can with a decent fitting lid.

Do not scoop cat litter right into a trash can and allow it to take a seat there for a long time. This can invite different insects into your house.

Can cat litter be flushed?

The answer is NO - Clay-primarily based litters cannot be flushed. Flushing clay can be bad for your toilet as it can get clogged. 

Some biodegradable litters, even though, indicate to be flushable at the packaging, is it meant to be flushed?

Flushing urine clumps is one factor, however, it is not encouraged to flush stool. This is for the same motive that it's no longer encouraged to compost used cat clutter. Even with modern-day wastewater treatment systems, T. Gondii and other intestinal parasites are often no longer caught and may live within the water supply. Therefore, it is harmful to flush cat litter in your toilets. 

Are there any biodegradable cat litter options?

Many biodegradable litters already exist, and extra holds are hitting the market. It is important as responsible cat parents and as people who want to help the environment that you use biodegradable litter rather than clay litter. Some options to consider other than rubber litter are:

  • Grass seeds
  • Newspaper
  • Wheat
  • Walnut shells
  • Coconut coir etc. 

Is cat litter compostable?

The very first compostable litter was actually a type of clay called Fuller's clay. Clay is no longer the only option that is used as cat litter nowadays. There are different biodegradable substrates, from compressed paper to corn to wheat. Some of these options are biodegradable and can be composable. 

If you’re committed to converting your cat’s litter, you can use this method: Replace 1/4 of your cat’s current clutter with the brand new litter each week so that at the end of the month, you’ve completely transitioned. This will help your cat get used to their new litter very efficiently. 

  • To be a little more environmentally friendly, here are some do's and don'ts biodegradable litter boxes for your kitties:
  • Don’t use liners; they’re an unnecessary waste.
  • Do use your contemporary box–even if it’s plastic–till the give up of its beneficial lifestyles! No point tossing and replacing something that also works. However, as soon as it’s run its course…
  • Do swap your container for a bamboo version like this one (it is available in a gaggle of colours, too).
  • Don’t use disposable scoops. There’s no point. Use a steel scoop like this, and if you’re concerned about contamination, store it in certainly one of your biodegradable pick up luggage. Clean it periodically with castile soap or vinegar.

Finally, about cleaning the litter box, stay with a moderate or gentle cleaner–like soap or vinegar, and rinse nicely. Never use harsh items like bleach to get for your cat’s paws, which she’ll then lick off. 

You can choose from a wide range of litter options for your kitties such as clay litter, grass litter, bamboo litter and many more organic and sustainable options.