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Often called the blue-eyed beauty, Himalayan cats are one of the most affectionate cats of the feline world. They're often confused with Persian cats, and whilst they do have a brachycephalic skull like the Persians, the Himalayans are pointed cats, which means that the extremities of their body, i.e. ears, tail, and paws, are dark-coloured, while the rest of their body is light-coloured.

The origin of the Himalayan cat dates back to 1930 when scientists at Harvard university crossed a Persian with a Siamese cat. The result was a cat that inherited the best characteristics of both cats - fluffiness, intelligence, charisma, and affection. The Himalayans today come in chocolate, seal, lilac-blue, and cream.

Often called the blue-eyed beauty, Himalayan cats are one of the most affectionate cats of the feline world. They're often confused with Persian cats, and whilst they do have a brachycephalic skull like the Persians, the Himalayans are pointed cats, which means that the extremities of their body, i.e. ears, tail, and paws, are dark-coloured, while the rest of their body is light-coloured.

The origin of the Himalayan cat dates back to 1930 when scientists at Harvard university crossed a Persian with a Siamese cat. The result was a cat that inherited the best characteristics of both cats - fluffiness, intelligence, charisma, and affection. The Himalayans today come in chocolate, seal, lilac-blue, and cream.

Average Adult Size and Life Expectancy

Size

Medium

Height

25 - 30 cm

weight

3 - 5 kg

Life Expectancy

9 - 15 years

Average Adult Size and Life Expectancy

Size

Medium

Height

25 - 30 cm

Weight

3 - 5 kg

Life Expectancy

9 - 15 years

Breed Traits and Characteristics

Shedding level

Heavy shedders (Hair Everywhere!)

Easy To Groom

High Maintenance (Daily Groom)

Tendency to vocalise

Low tendency to vocalise

Activity level

Somewhat high on energy

Need For Mental Stimulation

Needs a moderate job/activity

Child-Friendly

Good with children

Good With Other Pets

They get along well

First-Time Cat Parents

Breed Traits and Characteristics

Shedding Level

Heavy shedders (Hair Everywhere!)

Easy To Groom

High Maintenance (Daily Groom)

Tendency To Vocalise

Low tendency to vocalise

Activity Level

Somewhat high on energy

Need For Mental Stimulation

Needs a moderate job/activity

Child-Friendly

Good with children

Good With Other Pets

They get along well

First-Time Cat Parents

Himalayans are known to shed more than they clean themselves, which means they can suffer from hairballs more often than other cats. In such cases, it is best to speak to your veterinarian for either a hairball-prevention diet or a hairball-prevention supplement.

Apart from hairballs, the Himalayans can suffer from respiratory problems, especially in hot weather due to their thick coat and brachycephalic skull. Hence, it is best to put them onto a wet diet and keep them indoors under air conditioning when temperatures outside are more than 25 degrees Celsius. When it comes to nutrition, a tailored age-appropriate diet is crucial in ensuring a long and healthy life for your Himmie.

As effortlessly gorgeous as they look, grooming a Himalayan requires lots of time and effort, so much so that you cannot skip a single day of grooming. Himalayans require daily brushing and de-shedding to keep mats and hairballs to a minimum.

In addition to this, they require daily cleaning of tear stains, and weekly ear cleans. A Himalayan cat's grooming kit includes, but is not limited to, a slicker brush, a metal comb, a de-shedder, an ear cleaning solution, cat-safe wet wipes, and toothpaste. It is also helpful to visit a professional groomer once a month to help maintain your Himmie's coat at home. 

Himalayan cats enjoy mental stimulation in the form of puzzles and interactive toys and do well with anywhere between 1 to 2 hours of mental stimulation every day. Apart from mental stimulation, Himalayans require physical exercise to keep themselves from putting on unnecessary weight.

The best way to get a Himalayan to exercise is through different toys, each requiring them to use a different part of their body. In addition to this, cat trees and indoor agility courses also make for fun activities to let off some steam.

Himalayans are known to shed more than they clean themselves, which means they can suffer from hairballs more often than other cats. In such cases, it is best to speak to your veterinarian for either a hairball-prevention diet or a hairball-prevention supplement.

Apart from hairballs, the Himalayans can suffer from respiratory problems, especially in hot weather due to their thick coat and brachycephalic skull. Hence, it is best to put them onto a wet diet and keep them indoors under air conditioning when temperatures outside are more than 25 degrees Celsius. When it comes to nutrition, a tailored age-appropriate diet is crucial in ensuring a long and healthy life for your Himmie.

As effortlessly gorgeous as they look, grooming a Himalayan requires lots of time and effort, so much so that you cannot skip a single day of grooming. Himalayans require daily brushing and de-shedding to keep mats and hairballs to a minimum.

In addition to this, they require daily cleaning of tear stains, and weekly ear cleans. A Himalayan cat's grooming kit includes, but is not limited to, a slicker brush, a metal comb, a de-shedder, an ear cleaning solution, cat-safe wet wipes, and toothpaste. It is also helpful to visit a professional groomer once a month to help maintain your Himmie's coat at home. 

Himalayan cats enjoy mental stimulation in the form of puzzles and interactive toys and do well with anywhere between 1 to 2 hours of mental stimulation every day. Apart from mental stimulation, Himalayans require physical exercise to keep themselves from putting on unnecessary weight.

The best way to get a Himalayan to exercise is through different toys, each requiring them to use a different part of their body. In addition to this, cat trees and indoor agility courses also make for fun activities to let off some steam.

Know more about the other breeds

Beagle

Boxer

Daschund

Dobermann

German Shepherd

Golden Retriever

Indie

Labrador Retriever

Pug

Rottweiler

Shih Tzu

Siberian Husky

Bengal Cat

Indie Cat

Maine Coon Cat

Persian Cat

Siamese Cat

Know more about the other breeds

Beagle

Boxer

Daschund

Dobermann

German Shepherd

Golden Retriever

Indie

Labrador Retriever

Pug

Rottweiler

Shih Tzu

Siberian Husky

Bengal Cat

Indie Cat

Maine Coon Cat

Persian Cat

Siamese Cat